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Religious Slaughter Defined

Religious Slaughter is Legally defined as slaughter without mechanical stunning, For meat to be halal it has to be processed in the Islamic humane process of Non stun, This is not an opinion, its a fact.
In the UK Halal and Kosher are protected Under "Schedule 3" Regulation 27 (The Welfare of Animals at the Time of Killing) (England) Regulations 2015). According to Part 1, Schedule 3, 1.(c), killing is interpretated as, "killing in accordance with religious rites" means killing without infliction of unnecessary suffering. Acccordinlgy, the position of Mr Halal is that the pre stunning of an animal at the time of killing amounts to infliction of uncessary suffering and hence cannot be taken in accordance with religious rites. It is, therefore, submitted that 1. (c)(ii) of the Schedule 3, the Muslim method (halal) is without mechanical stunning, therefore meat processed by other than Religious Method cannot be labelled as Halal or Kosher.
Both Halal and Kosher are exempt from stunning therefore meat processed by other than Religious Method cannot be labelled as Halal or Kosher.


Guidelines for Halal Within the Islamic religion

A strong emphasis is placed on cleanliness- both spiritually and in the context of food and drink. For a food and drink product to be approved for consumption it must conform to the Islamic dietary laws as specified in the Quran, the saying of Prophet Muhammad, his Sunnah (tradition) and in Fiqh (understanding) of the Islamic Jurists.
The Quran has numerous injunctions instructing Muslims to choose and consume good wholesome foodstuffs. In the selection of food and drink, Islam has laid down three very important guidelines, namely;
1. Whether the consumption of the foodstuff is prohibited by Allah,
2. Whether the foodstuff is obtained through Halal or Haram means, and
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3. Whether or not the material is harmful to health. As an example, any pig product is considered Haram because the material itself is Haram
Whereas beef from an animal that has not been slaughtered according to Islamic rites would still be considered Haram. To determine the Halal-Haram status of the foodstuffs and other material, Islam has laid general guidelines on this matter, namely:
1. All raw materials and ingredients used must be Halal.
2. Naturally Halal animals such as cattle, goats etc., must be slaughtered according to Islamic rites, the rituals specify that the act must be performed by a mentally sound Muslim, to sever the blood and respiratory channels of the animal, using a sharp cutting tool such as knife. All foods are considered halal except the following:

1) Swine/pork and its by Swine/pork and its by-products or any derivatives. products or any derivatives. products or any derivatives.
2) Animals not slaughtered according to the Islamic requirements. requirements.
3) Alcohol and intoxicants. Alcohol and intoxicants Continued
4) Carnivorous animals, birds of prey. birds of prey. birds of prey.
5) Blood and blood by Blood and blood by-products. products. products.
6) Foods contaminated with any of the above products. Foods contaminated with any of the above products.
7) Food products and ingredients such as enzymes, gelatin, emulsifier, are considered mashbooh and must be verified before its application. before its application.

For Meat to be Halal

For meat to be halal it has to be processed in the Islamic humane process of Non stun, This is not an opinion, its a fact.
There are many slaughter procedures that religions and cultures use around the world. The two that are commercially relevant are the halal and kosher methods practiced by Muslims and Jews respectively. The global trade in red meat and poultry produced using these two methods is substantial, thus the importance of honest, clear labeling and the quality of the meat produced using the methods. Simply put, halal refers to the permissible.
The converse is haram, or what's not allowed. So halal and haram apply to more than just food restrictions. For Muslims, it's haram to cheat and be wasteful while it's halal to earn an honest living and spend prudently. That's not much different to the code of conduct that most people - regardless of religion - subscribe to.
FSA Guidance Notes on Halal food Issues were first issued by Sarah Appleby, Head of Enforcement and Local Authority Delivery Division in 2003 and re issued again in 2009. these documents took five years in producing at the cost of 5 million to the tax payer.